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Large States and Horizontal Federalism

Elizabeth Earle Beske writes that horizontal federalism, the relationship between states, "is poorly understood and increasingly important" in the context of the significant regulatory…

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Emergency Rule in India

A group of scholars trace the use over time of a provision in the Indian constitution that allows the federal government to dismiss a state government and…

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Podcast on Restorative Justice Through Tribal Jurisdiction

The California Law Review has released a podcast episode exploring how, despite decades of federal restrictions on tribal court criminal jurisdiction, indigenous-based restorative justice…

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Federalism and Black Popular Constitutionalism

Sean Beienburg and Benjamin B. Johnson write that the widely criticized Civil Rights Cases of 1883 reflected the elite idea that federalism in the context of…

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Panel on Federalism and the Separation of Powers

The Federalist Society has posted a video of a recent symposium panel titled "Federalism and the Separation of Powers." You can watch the video here.

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Does Modi’s Grip on Power Threaten India’s Future?

Ramachandra Guha looks ahead to consider how Prime Minister Narendra Modi's efforts to maintain power will affect India, predicting that "Indian federalism and unity…

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Are Housing Costs Better Addressed at the Federal or Local Level?

Erin Norman reviews the Biden administration's proposed housing-relief plan and suggests that a more productive solution to the housing issue would be for states to…

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Federalism and Government Debt

Chris Edwards of the Cato Institute contends that federalism offers a solution to the U.S. government's rising debt. Read more here.

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New Judicial Federalism in North Carolina

Anita Earls traces how the North Carolina Supreme Court has at times used the state's constitution to offer greater protection to individual rights than has…

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Could Federalism “Swallow” Unenumerated Rights?

Kimberly L. Wehle suggests that the Ninth Amendment, in conjunction with the Dobbs v. Jackson decision, could be used by the conservative majority of the U.S. Supreme…

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Review of Multilevel Governance Research

A group of scholars have prepared a systematic review of the literature of multilevel governance research. Read more here.

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A “Perpetual Crisis” of American Federalism?

Alison L. Lacroix writes that in attempting to enforce its own immigration policy, "Texas has reignited a debate about federalism that is as old…

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Federal EV Goals Squeeze State Transportation Infrastructure Funding

Jared Brey reports that, in the face of federal pressure to reduce fossil fuel emissions and boost the production of electric vehicles, states are…

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What is the purpose of the Center for the Study of Federalism (CSF)?

The Center for the Study of Federalism (CSF) is a nonpartisan, interdisciplinary research and education institution dedicated to supporting and advancing scholarship and public understanding of federal theories, principles, institutions, and processes as practical means of organizing power in free societies.

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All of the CSF Fellows hold advanced degrees, are affiliated with academic institutions, and are scholarly experts in their fields. For more on each Fellow see CSF Fellows.

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Most political and public issues in the United States are influenced to some extent by its federal system. Yet many do not understand that system. The CSF website seeks to foster a better understanding among the general public and scholars of federal governing systems generally and, specifically, of the federal system of government in the United States of America.

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Federalism Matters Podcast

Federalism is American government’s best kept secret. Its influence is pervasive and profound. Though not mentioned in the Constitution, federalism’s meaning and application have been at the center of disputes from 1776 to the Civil War to our current culture wars. We are scholars who focus on federalism, and through this podcast, we explore how federalism, from practice to theory, shapes our politics, policies, culture, society, and daily life.

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The Federalism Minute

Federalism’s influence on American government, culture and society is pervasive and profound, yet often unexplored. This short podcast examines single, practical topics to show how federalism’s influence is real and relevant in average citizens’ daily lives.

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