Visiting Scholars

Christa Altenstetter is Professor of Political Science at the City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center and Queens College. Her areas of expertise include comparative public policy, health policy, and policy-making in the European Union. She founded and chaired the International Political Science Association’s research committee on Comparative Health Policy. She has written extensively on comparative health care and health policy, including Medical Technology in Japan: The Politics of Regulation (Transaction, 2014); Medical Devices: European Union Policymaking and the Implementation of Health and Patient Safety. Health and Patient Safety in France (Transaction, 2008); Health Policy, co-edited with J. W. Börkman, volume 7 of The International Library of Comparative Public Policy edited by B. Guy Peters (Edward Elgar, 1998); Comparative Health Policy and the New Right: From Rhetoric to Reality, co-edited with S. C. Haywood (St. Martin’s, 1991); Innovation in Health Policy and Service Delivery: A Cross -National Perspective, editor (Oelgeschlager, Gunn and Hain, 1981); Federal – State Health Policies and Impacts: The Politics of Implementation with J. W. Björkman (University Press of America, 1979). She is also the author of Germany: A Brief History (Amazon Digital Services, 2011). As a Center Visiting Scholar, she worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program. As part of that effort, she contributed her extensive knowledge of Austrian and German federalism. Pursuant to that work, she published “Intergovernmental Profiles in the Federal Systems of Austria and West Germany: A Comparative Perspective,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 5:2 (Spring 1975): 89-116.

 

Ivo D. Duchacek (1913-1988) joined the Czech government in exile based in London after the Nazis invaded his home country. A former Christian Democratic member of Czechoslovakia’s parliament, he fled the country in 1948 after the Communist takeover. He migrated to New York City where he became Professor of Political Science at City College of the City University of New York in 1954 and later headed the doctoral program there. For some 38 years until his death, Duchacek delivered a weekly commentary to Czechoslovakia over the Voice of America.

As a Visiting Scholar, he worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program. He also was involved with Robert B. Hawkins, Donald S. Lutz, Elinor and Vincent Ostrom, Daniel J. Elazar, and others in the Federalism Roundtable exploring theories of federalism. He also contributed to the Covenant Workshop co-directed by Daniel Elazar and John Kincaid and served on the editorial advisory board of Publius: The Journal of Federalism. A leading scholar of comparative politics and international relations, he wrote numerous path-breaking works, including, among others:

Duchacek, Ivo D., Guest Editor. 1988. “Bicommunal Societies and Polities.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 18 (2): entire issue.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1988. “Dyadic Federations and Confederations.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 18 (2): 5-31.

Duchacek, Ivo D., Daniel Latouche, and Garth Stevenson, eds. 1988. Perforated Sovereignties and International Relations: Trans-sovereign Contacts of Subnational Governments. New York: Greenwood Press.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1986. The Territorial Dimension of Politics Within, Among, and Across Nations. Boulder, CO: Westview.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1985. “Consociational Cradle of Federalism.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 15 (2): 35-48.

Duchacek, Ivo D., Guest Editor. 1984. “Federated States and International Relations.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 14 (4): entire issue.

Duchachek, Ivo D. 1984. “The International Dimension of Subnational Self-Government.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 14 (4): 5-32.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1982. “Consociations of Fatherlands: The Revival of Confederal Principles and Practices.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 12 (4): 129-177.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1977. “Antagonistic Cooperation: Territorial and Ethnic Communities.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 7 (4): 3-29.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1975. “Internal and External Challenges to the Federal Bargain.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 5 (2): 41-76.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1973. Power Maps: Comparative Politics of Constitutions. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1973. Rights & Liberties in the World Today: Constitutional Promise and Reality. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-Clio.

Duchacek, Ivo D. 1971. Comparative Federalism: The Territorial Dimension of Politics. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

Duchacek, Ivo. D. 1960. Conflict and Cooperation Among Nations. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.

See also Kincaid, John. 1988. “In Memoriam: Ivo D. Duchacek.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 18 (2): 171-172.

 

Cynthia H. Enloe is a Research Professor of International Development, Community, and Environment at Clark University where she also served as Chair of the Political Science Department and Director of Women’s Studies. A leading feminist scholar, she has been recognized by the International Studies Association for challenging “conventional wisdom and organizational complacency in the international studies community.” She is the author of Bananas, Beaches and Bases: Making Feminist Sense of International Politics, 2nd edition (University of California Press, 2014); with Joni Seager, The Real State of America Atlas: Mapping the Myths and Truths of the United States (Penguin, 2011); and The Curious Feminist: Searching for Women in a New Age of Empire (University of California Press, 2004). As a Visiting Scholar, she worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program. As part of that effort, she also contributed her extensive knowledge of Malaysian federalism, and she published:

Enloe, Cynthia H. 1977. “Internal Colonialism, Federalism and Alternative State Development Strategies,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 7 (4): 145-160.

Enloe, Cynthia H. 1975. “The Neglected Strata: States in the City-Federal Politics of Malaysia,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 5 (2): 151-170.

 

Mark Kesselman is Professor Emeritus of Government at Columbia University. He is a leading scholar in the field of comparative politics with specializations in French politics, European politics, and globalization. He has served as the editor of the International Political Science Review. He is the author of Introduction to Comparative Politics, 7th edition (Cengage, 2015); The Politics of Power: A Critical Introduction to American Government, with Ira Katznelson and Alan Draper, 6th edition (W.W. Norton, 2010); Introduction to Politics of the Developing World, with William Joseph and Joel Krieger, 4th edition (Wadsworth, 2006); and The Politics of Globalization: A Reader (Houghton Mifflin, 2006). As a Visiting Scholar, he worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program.

 

Vukan Kuic, born in Sarajevo, Yugoslavia, immigrated to the United States in 1950. He is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of South Carolina. He has translated the works of Yves R. Simon and is the author of Yves R. Simon: Real Democracy (Rowman & Littlefield, 1999). As a Visiting Scholar, he worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program. He also coauthored with Yves Simon, “A Note on Proudhon’s Federalism,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 3:1 (Spring 1973): 19-30.

 

Alexandre Marc was born in 1904 in Odessa and died in 2000 in Venice. His life and work spanned Europe and the twentieth century. He and his family fled the Russian Revolution, settling in Paris. In World War II, he joined the French army, then founded the French resistance movement in Aix-en-Provence, then was forced to fee to Switzerland. In 1954, he founded the International Centre for European Studies (CIFE) for the study of personalist federalism, a school of thought founded by Marc and others in opposition to centrist collectivism and extreme individualism. Marc’s personalist ideas were based on the federalist principles of Pierre Joseph Proudon who conceived society as freely associating autonomous communities. Author, teacher, and advocate for European federalism, Marc assisted the Center as a Visiting Scholar in developing its Comparative Federalism Program. He also was involved with Robert B. Hawkins, Donald S. Lutz, Elinor and Vincent Ostrom, Daniel Elazar and others in the Federalism Roundtable exploring theories of federalism. He also worked closely with the Center in developing the International Association of Centers for Federal Studies of which CIFE was a founding member. He served on the editorial advisory board of Publius: The Journal of Federalism and published “New and Old Federalism: Faithful to the Origins,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 9:4 (Autumn 1979): 117-130. See also Ferdinand Kinsky, “In Memoriam: Alexandre Marc,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 30:4 (Autumn 2000): 117-130.

 

Elinor “Lin” Ostrom (1933-2012) was Distinguished Professor and Arthur F. Bentley Professor of Political Science at Indiana University where she co-founded in 1973 with her husband Vincent the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis. For many years, she served as Senior Research Director of the Workshop, later renamed the Vincent and Elinor Ostrom Workshop in their honor. In her path-breaking work Governing the Commons: The Evolution of Institutions for Collective Action (Cambridge University Press, 1990), she carefully laid out how associations of ordinary people can design the rules and institutions needed to manage common property without recourse to privatization or government intervention. In subsequent years, she and her colleagues developed important themes from her 1990 work in books on institutional incentives for sustainable development (1993); rules, games, and common-pool resources (1994); trust and reciprocity (2003); institutional diversity (2005); linking the formal and informal economy (2007); and understanding knowledge as a commons (2007). She grounded her work in field research, collaborative scholarship, and interdisciplinary thinking. In 2009 she shared the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences with Oliver E. Williamson for her analysis of “economic governance, especially the commons.” She was the first woman so honored in economics. She served as president of the American Political Science Association. She was the heart and soul of an international network of scholars and practitioners from Los Angeles to Nepal devoted to shared governing arrangements for sustainable agriculture and natural resource management that worked in theory and practice. As a Visiting Scholar of the Center, she was involved with Robert B. Hawkins, Donald S. Lutz, Vincent Ostrom, Daniel Elazar and others in the Federalism Roundtable exploring theories of federalism. She also served as a long-time member of the editorial advisory board of Publius: The Journal of Federalism and published:

Ostrom, Elinor, Roger B. Parks, and Gordon P. Whitaker. 1974. “Defining and Measuring Structural Variations in Interorganizational Arrangements.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 4 (4): 87-108.

Ostrom, Elinor. 1976. “Size and Performance in a Federal System.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 6 (2): 33-73.

 

Vincent Alfred Ostrom was born in 1919 and died in June 2012, 17 days after the passing of his beloved wife and partner Elinor Ostrom. The Arthur F. Bentley Professor Emeritus Professor of Political Science at Indiana University, he co-founded with his wife the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis and served as its Founding Director. A scholar’s scholar, he broke new ground in a field he often called constitutional choice by combining the strengths of political theory, constitutional thinking, and public administration. His early work began with down-to-earth subjects, including researching water policies and administration in the development of Los Angeles, assisting in the drafting of the Natural Resources article of the Alaska Constitution of 1959, and collaborating in 1961 with Charles Tiebout and Robert Warren on an important article on polycentricity as a concept and principle of the organization of government in metropolitan regions. Many of his essays were collected in the two-volume work, The Quest to Understand Human Affairs, edited by Barbara Allen (Lexington Books, 2010 and 2012). As a Visiting Scholar of the Center, he was involved with Robert B. Hawkins, Donald S. Lutz, Elinor Ostrom, Daniel Elazar and others in the Federalism Roundtable exploring theories of federalism. He also contributed to the Covenant Workshop co-directed by Daniel Elazar and John Kincaid, and he assisted in the development of the International Association of Centers for Federal Studies in which the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis was a member. He also served for many years on the editorial advisory board of Publius: The Journal of Federalism.  Among his publications are the following:

Ostrom, Vincent. 2008. The Political Theory of a Compound Republic: Designing the American Experiment. 3d ed. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Ostrom, Vincent. The Intellectual Crisis in American Public Administration. 3rd ed. Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2008.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1997. The Meaning of Democracy and the Vulnerability of Democracies: A Response to Tocqueville’s Challenge. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1995. “Where to Begin?” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 25 (2): 45–60.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1991. The Meaning of American Federalism: Constituting a Self-Governing Society. San Francisco: Institute for Contemporary Studies Press.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1990. “An Inquiry Concerning Liberty and Equality in the American Constitutional System.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 20 (2): 33-52.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1986. “Constitutional Processes and Federal Structure.” Teaching Politics 14 (2): 328-343.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1985. “The Meaning of Federalism in The Federalist: A Critical Examination of the Diamond Theses.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 15 (1): 1-21.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1985. “Historical Circumstances and Theoretical Structures as Sources of Meaning: A Response.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 15 (1): 55-64.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1980. “Hobbes, Covenant, and Constitution.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 10 (4): 83-100.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1979. “Dewey and Federalism: So Near and Yet So Far.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 9 (4): 87-101.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1978. “The Third Century: Some Anticipated Consequences of Governmental Reorganization.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 8 (2): 121-132.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1976. “The Contemporary Debate Over Centralization and Decentralization.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 6 (4): 21-32.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1974. “The Study of Federalism at Work.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 4 (4): 1-17.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1973. “Can Federalism Make a Difference?” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 3 (2): 197–237.

Ostrom, Vincent and Robert Bish. 1973. Understanding Urban Government: Metropolitan Reform Reconsidered. Washington, D.C.: American Enterprise Institute.

Ostrom, Vincent and Elinor Ostrom. 1965. “A Behavioral Approach to the Study of Intergovernmental Relations.” Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science 359 (May): 137–146.

Ostrom, Vincent, Charles M. Tiebout, and Robert Warren. 1961. “The Organization of Government in Metropolitan Areas: A Theoretical Inquiry.” American Political Science Review 55 (4): 831-842.

Ostrom, Vincent. 1953. Water and Politics: A Study of Water Policies and Administration in the Development of Los Angeles. Los Angeles: The Haynes Foundation.

 

Denis de Rougemont (1906-1985) was a Swiss philosopher and European federalist who joined with Alexander Marc and others in Paris in the 1930s to develop the theory of personalist federalism. In 1940, he returned to Switzerland, founding the Gotthard League to defend Swiss civil society and values against German Nazism. During World War II, he also was a French-speaking broadcaster for the Voice of America. After World War II, he founded the Centre Européen de la Culture and then the Graduate Institute of European Studies at the University of Geneva. His most famous work is Love in the Western World (Princeton University Press, 1940, 1956, 1972). However, he wrote on federalism, too, including Fédéralisme culturel (Neuchâtel: Baconnière, 1965); and Formule d’une Europe parallèle ou rêverie d’un fédéraliste libertaire (1979). He also was the director of Dictionnaire international du fédéralisme edited by François Saint-Ouen (Brussels: Bruylant, 1994). De Rougemont was a member of the Federalism Roundtable and assisted the Center in designing the International Association of Centers for Federal Studies. See also: Daniel J. Elazar, “In Memoriam: Denis de Rougemont (1906-1985),” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 17:1 (Winter 1987): 193.

 

Ira Sharkansky was a Professor of Political Science at the University of Wisconsin until 1975 when he moved to Israel. He joined the faculty of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem where he has remained, eventually becoming Professor Emeritus of Political Science and Public Administration. Until the mid-1980s, his research focused on American politics, including such works as The United States Revisited: A Study of a Still Developing Country (Longman, 1982); The Maligned States, 2nd edition (McGraw-Hill, 1972, 1977); The United States: A Study of a Developing Country (McKay, 1975); Urban Politics and Public Policy with Robert Lineberry (Harper & Row, 1971); Policy Analysis in Political Science (Markham, 1970); Public Administration: Policy-Making in Government Agencies (Markham, 1970); and Spending in the American States (Rand McNally, 1968). His research then shifted to the study of Israeli politics and government. As a Visiting Scholar, he worked with the Center and a team of scholars in developing the Center’s Comparative Federalism Program. He served on the editorial advisory board for Publius: The Journal of Federalism and also published:

Sharkansky, Ira. 2000. “Challenges to Authority That Are Significant, but Fall Short of Being Federal or Constitutional.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 30 (4): 1-24.

Sharkansky, Ira. 1975. “Structural Correlates of Least Developed Economies: Parallels in Governmental Forms, Politics and Public Policies among the Least Developed Countries and the Least Developed (U.S.) States.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 5 (2): 171-194.

 

G. Alan Tarr is a Board of Directors Professor Emeritus of Political Science at Rutgers University-Camden where he served as the Director of the Center for State Constitutional Studies. He also organized the International Association of Subnational Constitutional Law. He is a leading expert on state constitutional law and state courts and also has written extensively on U.S. and comparative federalism and constitutionalism. His works include American Constitutional Law, with Ralph Rossum, 2 volumes, 9th edition (Westview Press, 2016); Without Fear or Favor: Judicial Independence and Judicial Accountability in the American States (Stanford University Press, 2012); State Constitutions for the Twenty-First Century, co-editor with Robert F. Williams (State University of New York Press, 2005 [vol. 1] and 2006 [vol. 3]); Constitutional Origins, Structure, and Development in Federal Democracies, co-editor with John Kincaid (McGill-Queen’s Press, 2005); Federalism, Subnational Constitutions, and the Protection of Minority Rights, co-editor with Robert F. Williams and Josef Marko (Praeger, 2004); Understanding State Constitutions (Princeton University Press, 1998); Federalism and Rights, co-editor with Ellis Katz (Rowman & Littlefield, 1996); and State Supreme Courts in State and Nation with Mary Cornelia Aldis Porter (Yale University Press, 1988). With Robert F. Williams, he also served as series co-editor of the Sub-National Politics volumes in the International Encyclopedia of Laws (Kluwer Law International, 1957 –); and he is series editor of State Constitutions of the United States, 50 volumes (Greenwood, 1987 –). As a Center Visiting Scholar, he assisted John Kincaid and Ellis Katz in organizing conferences and seminars, editing publications, and providing direction for the Center’s State Constitutions Project. He was an active participant in the International Association of Centers for Federal Studies in which the Center for State Constitutional Studies is a member. He served on the editorial advisory board of Publius: The Journal of Federalism and also published:

Tarr, G. Alan. 2001. “Laboratories of Democracy? Brandeis, Federalism, and Scientific Management.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 31 (1): 37-46.

Tarr, G. Alan. 1994. “The Past and Future of the New Judicial Federalism.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 24 (2): 63-79.

Tarr, G. Alan. 1992. “Constitutional Theories and Constitutional Rights: Federalist Considerations.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 22 (2): 93-108.

Tarr, G. Alan and Mary Cornelia Porter. 1987. “Introduction: State Constitutionalism and State Constitutional Law.” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 17 (1): 1-12.

 

Robert F. Williams is Distinguished Professor of Law at Rutgers University School of Law, Camden, New Jersey, where he is Director of the Center for State Constitutional Studies. He is a leading expert in state constitutional law. He has written extensively on this subject and participated in numerous state constitutional law court cases in Florida, Iowa, New Jersey, North Dakota, and Pennsylvania. His books include State Constitutional Law: Cases and Materials, 5th edition with Lawrence Friedman (Lexis Law Publishing, 2015); State Constitutions for the Twenty-First Century (State University of New York Press, 2005 [vol. 1] and 2006 [vol. 3] co-editor with Alan Tarr; and 2006 [vol. 2] co-editor with Frank P. Grad); Federalism, Subnational Constitutions, and the Protection of Minority Rights, co-editor with G. Alan Tarr and Josef Marko (Praeger, 2004); Legislative Law and Process: Cases and Materials, 3rd edition, with Otto J. Hetzel and Michael E. Libonati (Lexis Law Publishing, 2001); and The New Jersey State Constitution: A Reference Guide, revised edition (Rutgers University Press, 1997). With G. Alan Tarr, he also served as series co-editor of the Sub-National Politics volumes in the International Encyclopedia of Laws (Kluwer Law International, 1957 –). As a Center Visiting Scholar, he assisted John Kincaid and Ellis Katz in organizing conferences and seminars, editing publications, and providing direction for the Center’s State Constitutions Project. He also published “State Constitutional Limits on Legislative Procedure: Legislative Compliance and Judicial Enforcement,” Publius: The Journal of Federalism 17:1 (Winter 1987): 91-114.